Skip to Content
NASHVILLE.gov - Metro Government of Nashville & Davidson County, Tennessee NASHVILLE.gov - Metro Government of Nashville & Davidson County, Tennessee (Print logo)
Health Department

Tobacco Control Initiative in Davidson County

The Health Promotion Division has initiated a comprehensive effort to reduce tobacco use by youth and to increase the number of smoke-free public places and work places in Nashville. Working through the Smoke-Free Nashville Coalition, this initiative conducts surveys to determine tobacco use by youth and carries out a number of public education efforts to discourage tobacco use. For more information, call the Health Promotion Division at (615) 880-3394.

Smoke-Free Venues in Nashville

Great American SmokeOut: The American Cancer Society (ACS) established this event in 1977 to educate the public on the dangers associated with tobacco use and to encourage smokers to quit for a lifetime by starting with just one day. The event is held annually on the third Thursday of November. During the past two years, the MPHD has partnered with local churches, the NAACP Health Committee and other community health organizations to plan and implement Nashville’s Great American SmokeOut (GASO) event.

Kick Butts Day: Kick Butts Day (KBD) was started by the Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids (CTFK) as an annual event held in the spring to promote youth advocacy on tobacco issues. It's a day for youth to stand out, speak up, and seize control in the fight against tobacco by raising awareness about tobacco—how it harms our health and how Big Tobacco targets kids—and supporting strong tobacco control policies. . If you would like more information about Kick Butts Day, please visit the Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids KBD page at http://kickbuttsday.org/

World No Tobacco Day: World No Tobacco Day (WNTD) is a World Health Organization event held on May 31st every year that informs the public on the dangers of using tobacco, the business practices of tobacco companies, what WHO is doing to fight the tobacco epidemic, and what people around the world can do to claim their right to health and healthy living and to protect future generations If you would like more information about World No Tobacco Day, please visit the World Health Organization’s Tobacco page.

Want to Stop Smoking?

Tennessee Tobacco Quitline

1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669)
Callers to the quitline can receive a free tobacco quit kit, work with a free quit coach, and learn to deal with their cravings and challenges. For more information about the quitline: http://health.state.tn.us/tobaccoquitline.shtml

Vanderbilt Dayani Center

1500 22nd Avenue South
Nashville, TN 37232
Contact: Barbara Forbes
Telephone: (615) 343-7309
Additional Information: Four group sessions per year. Eight classes per session. This is a behaviorally-based program incorporating relapse prevention. Individual and group-based program tailoring and follow-up is available. Medication used, nurse practitioner prescribed.

St. Thomas Hospital

One on One counseling for 3 sessions
Cost: $100 fee

Pulmonary Services Department
4220 Harding Road
Nashville, TN 37205
Telephone: 222-6506 or 1-888-603-6506
Call for more information

Nicotine Anonymous (NICA)

A Twelve Step Program of Recovery. Meetings take place in Nashville.
Website: www.nicotine-anonymous.org
Email: info@nicotine-anonymous.org

American Lung Association’s “Freedom from Smoking”

Freedom From Smoking® (FFS) is a highly structured and comprehensive behavior modification approach to smoking cessation in a group support setting. FFS is based on the premise that smoking is a learned behavior. The seven session format provides for tracking personal habits, developing coping strategies and practice in a supportive environment with others who are experiencing the same feelings and challenges.
Cost: $50 refundable fee

Call Medline to find out when and where the next series of “Freedom From Smoking” classes will take place.

Phone: 1-800-242-5662 or (615) 342-1919

 Helpful Tobacco Websites

Tobacco Facts

Facts About Youth Smoking

  • 90% of smokers start before the age of 19. (cdc.gov/tobacco, 2008)

  • Twenty-three percent of high school students in the United States are current cigarette smokers—23% of females and 22.9% of males. (cdc.gov/tobacco, 2008)

  • Approximately 26% of whites, 22% of Hispanics, and 13% of African Americans in high school are current cigarette smokers. (cdc.gov/tobacco, 2008)

  • Tobacco use in adolescence is associated with many other health risk behaviors, including higher risk sexual behavior and use of alcohol or other drugs. (cdc.gov/tobacco, 2008)

Davidson County Youth Smoking Rates

  • 21.3% of Davidson County youth report being current tobacco users. (2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey).

  • 30% of Davidson County youth reported buying their last pack of cigarettes at a gas station or convenience store. 63.6% were not asked for proof of age when purchasing cigarettes. (2004 Youth Tobacco Survey)

  • 59.5% of youth smokers reported “wanting to quit. However, 61.2% of youth reported being unaware of smoking cessation programs available in their school or community. (2004 Youth Tobacco Survey)

  • 54.1% Davidson County youth reported being exposed to secondhand smoke in their homes. (2004 Youth Tobacco Survey)

  • Only 26.2% of Davidson County students reported being “taught about the dangers of tobacco”. (2004 Youth Tobacco Survey)

Facts About Adult Smoking

  • Tobacco is the only "consumer product" which when used exactly as the manufacturer intends, causes disease, disability and death.

  • Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in Nashville and the United States.

  • The Center for Disease Control (CDC) estimates more than 430,000 Americans die of smoking-related causes each year – accounting for one out of every five deaths.

Davidson County Adult Smoking Rates

  • 19.3% of adults in Davidson County are tobacco users which is lower than the state average of 22.0%. The national average is 18.3%. (2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey, BRFSS)

  • According to the Health, Nashville, 2002 report issued by the Metro Public Health Department (MPHD), four out of the top five causes of death for Davidson County residents are related to smoking: heart disease, cancer, stroke, and chronic lower respiratory disease.