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Historical Markers - Nashville Sites

Belle Meade Golf Links Historic District

Platted in 1915 by developer Johnson Bransford, Belle Meade Golf Links is one of the early subdivisions that arose from the dissolution of the world-famous Belle Meade Plantation. This small residential district represents early 20th century subdivision design and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

Location: Belle Meade Golf Links, Intersection of Windsor Dr. and Blackburn Ave.
Erected: 2005

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Belle Vue

The original log part of this house was built about 1818 by Abram DeMoss and named for the house his father Lewis DeMoss, built in 1797 overlooking the Harpeth River a mile southwest. In time the name was given to the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad depot and to the U.S. Post Office. Thus the Bellevue community owes its name to this historic site.

Corrections: The original log part of this house is now thought to have been built by John Garrett. The left front section was built by Thomas Harding around 1802, and the right section which connected the two sections of the house was built about 1820 by Abram and Betsy DeMoss. It was named for the house his father, Lewis DeMoss, built about 1800 overlooking the Harpeth River a mile southwest.

Location: 7306 Old Harding Road
Erected: 1971

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Belmont-Hillsboro Neighborhood

When Adelicia Acklen’s estate was sold in 1890, the Belmont Mansion and its grounds became Belmont College. Other portions, and parts of the neighboring Sunnyside Mansion property, were subdivided into residential lots by the Belmont Land Co. In 1900-1910, streetcar lines were built running to Cedar Lane on Belmont Boulevard and to Blair Boulevard on 21st Ave. The neighborhood became a National Register Historic District in 1980.

Erected: 2011

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Belmont Mansion

This mansion, designed by an Italian architect, and built in 1850 by Joseph A.S. Acklen and his wife Adelicia, was the center of an extensive estate. Massive gates on Granny White and Hillsboro Pikes and tree-lined driveways enhanced the 180 acres that included greenhouses, gardens, zoo, lake, and the largest private art gallery in the South.
Corrections:
1. Belmont was the work of Adolphus Heiman, not an Italian architect.
2. Built in early 1850’s
3. Closer to 175, than 180 acres.

Location: Belmont Campus in front of the mansion
Erected: 1969

Note: Belmont is now known to be the work of Adolphus Heiman. The first section of the house was completed in early 1853, and the total acreage of the plantation was closer to 175 than 180 acres.

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Bradley Studios

In 1955, brothers Owen and Harold Bradley built a recording studio in the basement of a house on this site. They added another studio here in an army Quonset Hut, producing hits by Patsy Cline, Red Foley, Brenda Lee, Marty Robbins, Sonny James, and others. Columbia Records purchased the studios in 1962. The studio established its reputation in the music industry with hits by stars including Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan, Roger Miller, George Jones, and Tammy Wynette. DONATED BY THE MIKE CURB FOUNDATION

Erected: 2011

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Buchanan Log House

James Buchanan (1763-1841) built this two-story single pen log house with hall and parlor plan c1807. The single pen log addition was added c1820 to accommodate the Buchanan family’s sixteen children. The house displays a high level of craftsmanship and is one of the best examples of two-story log construction in Middle Tennessee. The house was restored and placed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Location: Elm Hill Pike in front of Buchanan Log House
Erected: 2008

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Captain Ryman's Home

On this site stood the residence of Captain Thomas Green Ryman, owner of the Ryman steamboat line and builder of the Union Gospel Tabernacle, renamed Ryman Auditorium after his death in 1904. The Queen Anne frame house with a slate roof, seven gables and two turrets, served as the home of Captain and Mrs. Ryman and their seven children from 1885-1926. The house was razed in 1940.

Location: 500 block, Second Avenue South
Erected: 1994

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Central High School

Founded in 1915 as the first public high school in the county system, Central High School stood here from 1921-1971. One of the earliest student government associations in the South began here. Many graduates became city and county political leaders. The last mayor of the old Nashville City Government, Ben West, and first Metro Government mayor, Beverly Briley, were classmates here.

Location: 161 Rains Avenue
Erected: 1997

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Chickasaw Treaty

In 1783, Chickasaw chiefs met with white settlers at a spring 100 yards north and agreed on land rights—the Cumberland country for the settlers, the Tennessee River lands beyond the Duck River ridge for the Chickasaw. This tribe became firm friends of James Robertson and his people, but the settlement suffered many more raids by Cherokees and Creeks.

Location: Corner of Morrow Rd & Terry Dr.
Erected: 1969

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City of Edgefield

The portion of East Nashville known as Edgefield, the name suggested by Gov. Neill S. Brown, was incorporated as a city Jan. 2, 1869. Its approximate bounds were Shelby Ave., Sevier St., So. 10th St., Berry St., Cowan Ave. and the River. It’s first mayor was W.A. Glenn and its last was S.M. Wene. It was annexed to the City of Nashville Feb. 6, 1880.
Corrections: An ‘L’ has been deleted from Neill S Brown.
The first initial of Mr. Wene, Edgefield’s last mayor, is incorrect. His first initial should be S rather than W. Also, the Nashville city directory for 1878 lists S.M. Wene followed by the title “Mayor of Edgefield.”

Location: E side of Woodland St. Bridge
Erected: 1970, replaced in 1997

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Clover Bottom Mansion

Built in 1858 by Dr. James Hoggatt on land inherited from his father, Capt. John Hoggatt, a Revolutionary War soldier, this fine Italian villa style home is centered in an area of local historical significance. John Donelson settled early in this rich Stones River bottom area, followed by Andrew Jackson, who married his daughter, Rachel.

Location: 2930 Lebanon Road
Erected: 1976

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Cornelia Fort Airport

Cornelia Fort (1919-43), Nashville’s first woman flying instructor volunteer, Army’s WAFS, WWII, was the first woman pilot to die on war duty in American history. “I am grateful that my one talent, flying, was useful to my country.” she wrote shortly before her death. Miss Fort was lost in a crash over Texas flying a basic-trainer plane, BT 13-A, across the United States.

Location: Cornelia Fort Airport, Airpark Drive
Erected: 1976

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The Craighead House

This Federal-style home was built c1810 for John Brown Craighead and his first wife Jane Erwin Dickinson. Craighead was the son of early Nashville settler the Rev. Thomas Craighead. In 1823, Craighead married Lavinia Robertson Beck, youngest daughter of Nashville founders Charlotte and James Robertson. Major additions to the house were made in 1824, 1919, and 1998. Developers purchased the Craighead estate in 1905 and planned the present-day Richland-West End neighborhood.

Location: Westbrook Ave
Erected: 2009

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Cumberland Park

The Cumberland Fair and Racing Association sponsored harness racing here 1891-1894. The great match race between Hal Pointer of Tennessee and Direct of California occurred Oct. 21, 1891. Direct won all three heats in record time for a pacing race. Arion, Directum, Kremlin, Robt. J. raced here. Running races 1893-1906 preceded the State Fair 1906.

Location: State Fairgrounds
Erected: 1970

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Customs House

President Rutherford B. Hayes laid its cornerstone in 1877. Designed by Treasury Department architect W.A. Potter, it was occupied in 1882 by collectors of customs and internal revenue, U.S. courts, and Nashville’s main post office. Addition to rear began in 1903, wings in 1916. Declared surplus in 1976, then given to the City, it was renovated by the development firm that leased it.

Location: 701 Broadway
Erected: 1982

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Devon Farm

Home of John Davis, early surveyor, who came from N.C. to Nashville in 1788. Davis was an Indian fighter & scout in the State Militia until 1795. He settled on Big Harpeth in 1795-96 and that year built a 1½-story home of hand-
made brick. The farm, named for Devon cattle bred here, has been owned by seven generations of Davis-Hicks descendants.
Recent research shows that this home was built by Giles Harding who came to Davidson County from Virginia and purchased this tract of land in 1798. Harding’s son, Morris Harding, married Fanny Davis, daughter of John Davis. John davis lived in the area, about 3 m NW of the Harding Place. The Hardings had no children, and Fanny’s nephew, Edward Hicks, a well-known breeder of Devon cattle, inherited the farm after his aunt’s death and changed its name from “Oak Hill” to “Devon Farm”.

Location: Hwy 100 near Devon Farm entrance
Erected: 1975

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Duncan College Preparatory School for Boys

Marvin T. Duncan, a graduate of Webb School (Bell Buckle) and Vanderbilt University, founded Duncan School in 1908 at this site on 25th Avenue, S. He and his wife, Pauline, taught at the school until it closed in 1952. The Duncans dedicated their lives to training boys in high principles of honor and scholarship. The school graduated some 752 men and 6 women, including many community leaders.

Location: 25th Avenue South in front of Vanderbilt Mem. gym
Erected: 1999

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Dutchman's Curve Train Wreck

The deadliest train wreck in U.S. history occurred on July 9, 1918, when two crowded trains collided head-on at Dutchman’s Curve. the impact caused passenger cars to derail into surrounding cornfields, and fires broke out throughout the wreckage. Over 100 died, including many African-American workers journeying to work at the munitions plant near Old Hickory.

Sponsored by the Bellevue Harpeth Historic Association

Location: White Bridge Road at Richland Creek Greenway Trailhead
Erected: 2008

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East Nashville Fire

Nashville’s worst disaster by fire occurred Wednesday, March 22, 1916. It began at 11:47 a.m. in the rear of Seagraves Planing Mill, 80 yards west, and was swept eastwardly by 44 to 51 mph gales. It was brought under control at 4:30 p.m. near So. Tenth and Dew Streets. 648 buildings were burned, 1 life lost and 3,000 people left homeless.

Location: E side of N 1st St. n of Oldham
Street intersection, across from Capitol Lumber
Co. building.
Erected: 1968

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Edmondson Home Site

Will Edmondson, born about 1883 of former slave parents in the Hillsboro area of Davidson County, worked as a railroad and hospital laborer until 1931, when he began his primitive limestone carvings. Working without formal training, he produced some remarkable sculptures which won high praise in exhibits across the nation. He died in 1951.

Location: 1450 14th Ave S
Erected: 1976

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Edwin Warner Park 606.7 acres

Edwin Warner (1870-1945) succeeded his brother Percy on the Park Board in 1927 and served for eighteen years. He personally directed the acquisition of most of the Warner Park acreage and supervised WPA development of the property. Warner organized a major Victory Garden program in the park during WWII. Park land west of Old Hickory Blvd. was renamed in his honor in 1937.

Location: Highway 100 at Edwin Warner Park entrance
Erected: 1982

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Eighth Avenue South Reservoir

This 51 Mil. Gal. Reservoir was built 1887-89 on Kirkpatrick Hill, the site of Federal Fort Casino during Civil War. It is elliptical in shape with axes of 603 & 463.4 ft. Perimeter of wall is 1,746 ft. & water depth is 31 ft. Rupture in east wall occurred at 12:10 a.m., Nov. 5, 1912. The interior was waterproofed in 1921. Designated as a National Water Landmark by AWWA, 1971.

Location: 8th Ave. S entrance to reservoir.
Erected: 1971

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Ezell House

In 1805 Jeremiah Ezell (1775-1838) moved here from Virginia and purchased 17 acres of land on Mill Creek. In 1816 he served on the Court of Pleas for Davidson County. In 1888, his grandson, Henry Clay Ezell, built this brick vernacular Queen Anne style house. His large farm was known for breeding fine mules from stock imported from Spain.

Location: corner of Old Ezell Rd and Donelson Pk/Harding Pl.
Erected: 2003

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Fall School

Fall School, built in 1898, is the oldest public school building remaining in Nashville. Named after Mr. P.S. Fall, a prominent Nashville businessman and member of the Board of Education from 1865-1867, it served as an elementary school until 1970. In 1982 it was privately renovated for offices. Unlike the earlier study hall design, Fall School had individual classrooms.

Location: 1116 8th Avenue So.
Erected: 1982

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First Steam Locomotive

On Dec. 13, 1850, the first steam engine, Tennessee No. 1, ordered by the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad arrived at the wharf on the steamboat Beauty, from Cincinnati. The one mile trip on improvised track from the wharf to the S. Cherry St. crossing required 4 days by mule power. A one mile run was made from this point on Dec. 27, 1850.

Location: Fourth Ave. South railroad crossing at Hart St.
(This marker was removed due to vehicle damage and is awaiting replacement)
Erected: 1971

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The Germantown Historic District

European immigrants established Germantown, the first suburb in North Nashville, in the 1850s. Large brick townhouses stood next to modest workers’ cottages, illustrating the area’s economic and social diversity. World War I and changes in public attitude began decades of decline. Renovation projects at two historic churches began the neighborhood’s revitalization in the 1970s. Germantown became a National Register Historic District in 1979.

Location: NW corner of Jefferson St and 6th Ave. North
Erected: 2003

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Glendale Park

Here, near the center of a 64-acre woodland amusement park owned by the Nashville Railway & Light Co., the Glendale streetcar line turned back toward town. The park opened in 1888 to attract passengers for the railway—originally steam, electric after 1893. A zoo was added in 1912. The park closed in 1921, a casualty of automobiles and the Depression.

Location: Intersection of Lealand & Tower Pl.
Erected: 1970

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Granny White Grave

Grave of Lucinda “Granny” White, who settled here in 1803 on 50 acres of land. She died in 1815 at about age 73. Granny White Tavern stood 200’ to the north. Famous for its food, brandy and comfortable beds, it attracted travelers from the Natchez Trace, four miles to the west. Grave restored by General James Robertson chapter D.A.R.

Location: 5100 block of Granny White Pike
Erected: 1970

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Grassmere

Col. Michael C. Dunn, a landowner and Sheriff, built a home in the Federal style ca. 1810. A grandson-in-law, William D. Shute, received the farm in 1859 and named it Grassmere. Intact following the Civil War, the house was renovated and an Italianate porch added ca. 1880. Margaret and Elise Croft 5th generation descendants, lived here until their deaths. Wishing to preserve the
farm, the sisters gave it to future generations as a “nature study center.”

Location: 3777 Nolensville Road
Erected: 2001

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The Harpeth Hall School

On Sept. 17, 1951, Harpeth Hall opened as an independent girls’ college preparatory school on the former P.M. Estes estate. Susan Souby headed the first school of 161 girls. Originating with Ward Seminary (1865-1913); Belmont College for Young Women (1890-1913); and the Ward Belmont School (1913-1951), Harpeth Hall continued Nashville’s tradition of superior single-gender education. Motto: Let us lift up the mind and spirit.

Location: 3801 Hobbs Road
Erected: 2003

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Heaton's Station

On this bluff in 1780, pioneers who came with James Robertson built Heaton’s (also spelled Eaton’s) station. It and two other forts (Freeland’s and Nashborough) withstood all Indian attacks and saved the Cumberland settlements. On the river below were successively a buffalo fort, ferry and Lock No. 1. The home of Amos Heaton stood 100 feet north.

Location: Lock No. 1 Road at end of Seminary Avenue
Erected: 1968

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Hill Forest

In 1910, H.G. Hill, Sr. purchased this 324 acres including an old-growth forest west of downtown Nashville. He refused to allow the trees to be sold for timber, and fenced the forest to keep his cattle from damaging the centuries-old trees. Hill enjoyed its pristine beauty throughout his lifetime. In 2009, the Friends of Warner Parks purchased the land from the Hill family, ensuring that this ancient forest in an urban setting will continue to be preserved.

Location: Not erected as of this date

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Hillsboro Toll Gate No. 1

Ten yards north stood toll gate and toll gate house erected by Nashville and Hillsboro Turnpike Co., Incorporated in 1848. Charges to travel macadamized road could not exceed: horse or mule, 3¢; 10 sheep, 20¢; 20 meat cattle, 25¢; carriage drawn by pair of horses or mules, 25¢. Toll removed in 1903. Toll gate house, enlarged, stands 20 yds. northwest.

Location: Lawn of fire department near Hillsboro Road and Blair Boulevard
Erected: 1970

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Houston's Law Office

Sam Houston, a native of Virginia, moved to Nashville in 1818 to study law with Judge James Trimble. Admitted to the bar later that year, Houston practiced in Lebanon, Tenn., before returning to Nashville to serve as District Attorney (1819-21). In 1821, he opened a law office near this site. He was elected a U.S. Congressman (1823-27), Governor of Tenn. (1827-29), and President of the Republic of Texas (1836-38).

Donated by the Nashville Bar Association in 1999.

Location: 2nd Ave. North at the Criminal Justice Center
Erected: 1999

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Hyde's Ferry Turnpike

Here was toll-gate #2 of the Hyde’s Ferry Turnpike Co., chartered in 1848 to build a road from Nashville to Ashland City and Sycamore Hills. Richard Hyde’s ferry crossed the Cumberland 2.6 m. southeast, where the railroad bridge is now. Davidson County paid $10,000 for its part of the road in 1901. Cheatham County bought its portion and freed it from tolls in 1916.

Location: Hyde’s Ferry Rd & Cato Rd.
Erected: 1971

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J. W. Price Fire Hall

Constructed in 1892 for Hose Company #1, this building is one of the earliest extant fire halls in Nashville. The upstairs housed firefighters while the lower floor stabled the company’s two horses. R. C. Burk served as the first Captain. The fire hall was renamed for J.W. Price, a local businessman, c1910. In 1993, the building reopened as a branch of the Nashville Public Library, and is named for State Legislators Charles and Mary Pruitt.

Erected: 2011

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Jackson's Law Office

Andrew Jackson settled in Nashville in 1788 and served as Atty. Gen. until 1796. Lawyer John Overton owned a building here (1791-96) and shared office space with his friend Jackson. Jackson was Tennessee’s first Rep. to Congress (1796) and state Superior Court judge (1798-1804). He led U.S. troops to victory at the 1815 Battle of New Orleans and was elected President in 1828.

Donated by the Nashville Bar Association
Location: 333 Union Street (wall marker)
Erected: 1996

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Johnson's Station

A double log house and a few log cabins, partially picketed, stood here about 1790. On May 9, 1793, 4 children on their way to the spring were attacked by Indians. Three were scalped and killed. One escaped. The home of Charles Bosley, wealthy pioneer and a member of the Nickajack Expedition, later stood on this site.

Location: W side of Harding Rd. near Richland Creek near Overbrook School
Erected: 1969

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Lake Providence Community

Soon after the Civil War, freed slave families established farms and dairies in this community named for Lake Providence Missionary Baptist Church. The church was founded in 1868 by Rev. Larry A. Thompson, a traveling missionary. The first church building and school stood nearby. Many roads in this area are named for African-American settlers.

Location: 4500 block Nolensville Road
Erected: 1996

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Lockeland Spring

Located 250 yds. S.E., this famous pioneer spring served Lockeland mansion on site of present school building. Home built by Col. Robert Weakley in early 1800’s and named for his wife, daughter of Gen. Matthew Locke of Salisbury, N.C. Spring water won prize at St. Louis Exposition in 1904, for its “unique mineral composition and salubrious quality.”

Location: 100 South 17th St.
Erected: 1970

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Luke Lea Heights

Luke Lea (1879-1945) envisioned this park, gave to the city in 1927 the original 868 acres, and asked that the land be named for his father-in-law, Percy Warner. Founder of the Nashville Tennessean, Lea was a key developer of Belle Meade, a U.S. senator, organizer and colonel of the 114th Field Artillery, WWI.
To honor him the Park Board named a high hill and overlook Lea Heights.

Location: Belle Meade Bv at Warner Park entrance
Erected: 1990

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Madison College

Madison College was founded in 1904 as Nashville Agricultural Normal Institute by Seventh-Day Adventists on a farm of 412 acres. A sanitarium and campus industries were integral to the plan of work and study for students training for careers in agriculture, teaching, religion, industrial arts, nursing and allied health courses, and other fields.

Location: Madison, Neely’s Bend Rd @ TCMC
Erected: 1970

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Mansker's First Fort

Here on west bank of the creek that he discovered on 1772, Kasper Mansker and other first settlers built a log fort in 1779. John Donelson’s family fled here in 1780 for safety from Indians. Mansker abandoned the fort in 1781 and moved to Fort Nashborough. He returned in 1783, built a stronger stockade on east bank of the creek a half mile upstream, and lived here until he died in 1820.

Location: Goodlettsville on Long Hollow Pike near Moss Wright Park
Erected: 1981

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Marathon Motor Car

The Marathon motor car was manufactured there 1910-1914 by the Southern Motor Works (later called Marathon). Four models, all touring cars, were powered by engines of 4 cylinders, 30/35 hp & 6’s of 50 hp, with wheel-bases from 9’8” to 12’5”. The plant closed operations in 1914 due to financial difficulties but continued a parts & service business until 1918.

Location: 12th Ave. N & Clinton St
Erected: 1970

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Meharry Medical College

Meharry Medical College, established in 1876 through the efforts of Dr. George W. Hubbard, Dr. William J. Sneed, and Samuel Meharry, is the only AMA Accredited, privately endowed, predominantly Negro medical school in the world. During its first 90 years of service, it trained more Negro physicians and dentists than any other institution.

Location: Meharry Medical College, D.B. Todd Boulvard entrance.
Erected: 1969

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Montgomery Bell Academy

Formerly established in 1867 with a bequest of $20,000 by ironmaster Montgomery Bell, the roots of M.B.A. actually go back to 1785, with the University of Nashville, Cumberland College, and Davidson Academy. The boy’s preparatory school has been here since 1915, when the Board of Trustees purchased Totomoi, the estate of Garland Tinsley.

Location: 4001 Harding Road
Erected: 1975

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Mount Pisgah Community

In 1867, Jane Watson deeded land to several African-American families, many of them her former slaves. First called Watson Town, the community became known as Mt. Pisgah by 1871. The Methodist Episcopal Church North organized a church here in 1866 and bought an acre of land from William Holt in 1869 for a church and school building. The second church building, used 1916-1976, stood along the Owen & Winstead Pike, now Edmondson Pike.

Donated by the Mt. Pisgah United Methodist Church.

Location: 6245 Mount Pisgah Road
Erected: 2001

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Mud Tavern

The Mud Tavern Community developed around the crossroads of the Elm Hill and McGavock Turnpikes. The name derives from the mud and log inn at the crossroads where early 19th century travelers found rest and refreshment. Mud Tavern later became a lively rural community, with a railway stop, schools, post office, and general store, which thrived until overtaken by 20th century commercial development.

Location: Elm Hill Pike
Erected: 2008

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Nashville Academy of Medicine

The Nashville Medical Society, the first medical association in Tennessee, was founded March 5, 1821, by 7 physicians in the log courthouse on the Public Square. Pres. was Dr. Felix Robertson, first white child born in Nashville. Chartered Sept. 4, 1906, by State as Nashville Academy of Medicine & Davidson County Medical Society.

Location: 205 23rd Ave. N
Erected: 1975

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Nashville Centennial 1780-1880

The Centennial Exposition on this site in 1880 from April 23 through May 30, marked a century of progress since the founding of Nashville. There were parades, oratory, music, historical, art and commercial exhibits; theatrical performances, and “the grandest display of fireworks ever seen in Nashville.”

Location: SW corner of intersection of Broadway and 8th Avenue.
Erected: 1969

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Nashville Fire Department

The city’s first fire-fighting force of volunteers was formed in May 1807. The first paid Dept. was organized on July 29, 1860, with J.S. Dashiell as chief. Three horse-drawn steam engines were bought. A telegraph alarm was installed in 1875. Chief A.A. Rozetta used the first auto Nov. 21 1910. First gasoline driven engines were used Sept. 1912.

Location: 506 2nd Ave N
Erected: 1970

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Nashville General Hospital

Opened on this site February 1890, with a capacity of 60 beds. Doctor Charles Brower of the University of Nashville Medical Department was appointed Superintendent. In 1891 a school of nursing was opened with Miss Charlotte E. Perkins as Superintendent. This was the first training school for nurses between the Ohio River and New Orleans.

Location: Hermitage Avenue
Erected: 1971

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Nashville Plow Works

Site of a farm implement factory operated by Messrs. Sharp and Hamilton, previous to the War Between the States. With the outbreak of hostilities they reversed the Biblical injunction and produced swords of excellent quality for the Confederacy. With the coming of the Federal Army, the making of swords was discontinued.

Location: SE corner of 8th Ave S & Palmer Place
Erected: 1968

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The Nashville Race Course

The Nashville Race Course, the “Burns Island Track,” 1828-1884, was .6 of a mile north. Here Oct. 10, 1843, was run the then richest race in the world, the $35,000 Peyton Stakes, 4 mile heats, promoted by Bailie Peyton. The winner owned by Thomas Kirkman, was renamed “Peytona.” Ten Broeck and Thora also raced here.

Location: East end of Clay St near Bush’s Lake.
Erected: 1968

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Nashville Sit-Ins

Formerly located at this site was First Baptist Church, Capitol Hill, headquarters of the 1960s Sit-In Movement, led by Rev. Kelly Miller Smith. Strategy sessions, non-violence workshops, mass meetings, victory celebrations, and administrative office were here. The well-disciplined Nashville sit-ins served as a model for civil rights demonstrations throughout the South.

Location: 8th Ave N and Charlotte Pike
Erected: 1992

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Nashville YMCA

On this site in the Christian Church the Nashville Young Men’s Christian Association was organized May 18, 1875. Its first building erected 1886 on Church Street between Cherry and College, was destroyed by fire in 1894. In 1912 it moved to its new eight-story building on Seventh and Union which it occupied until 1972 when it moved to its present building, 1000 Church St.

Location:
Erected: 1975

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Nashville's First Public School

JNashville’s first public school, Hume School, opened here Feb. 26, 1855. A three story brick building, the school employed 12 teachers and served all grades. In 1874 high school classes were moved to Fogg school built on adjoining corner lot. Named for educators, Alfred E. Hume & Francis B. Fogg, the schools were replaced by Hume-Fogg in 1912.

Location: Facing 8th Av. between alley & corner
Erected: 1969

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Nashville's First Radio Station

June 1922, Boy Scout John H. DeWitt, Jr., started Nashville’s first radio station (WDAA) on the Ward-Belmont Campus. Assisted by music teacher G.S. deLuca, he broadcast Enrico Caruso records to the opening of the River and Rail Terminal on the river at Broad Street. DeWitt was WSM radio station’s chief engineer, 1932-1942, and president, 1947-1968.

Location: Belmont University Campus-Freeman Hall
Erected: 1997

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Newsom's Mill

The original Newsom’s Mill was located upstream & was destroyed by flood in 1808. Joseph M. Newsom constructed this turbine-powered gristmill in 1862 of hand-dressed limestone cut from Newsom’s Quarry, a mile south. Newsom’s stone is found in many important buildings in the city of Nashville.

Location: Hwy 70 and Newsom Station Rd
Erected: 1976

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Oglesby Community House

Built 1898, the Mary Lee Academy, the second school in the Oglesby Community, was named for its first teacher, Miss Mary Lee Clark. The county bought the school in 1906. The name changed to Ogilvie in honor of the land donor, Benton H. Ogilvie, and later becames Oglesby. In 1943, the schoolhouse was given back to the Oglesby Community.

Location: Old Hickory Bv. & Edmondson Pk.
Erected: 1982

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Old Hickory Powder Plant

Site of the $87,000,000 Old Hickory Powder Plant built and operated in 1918 by the E.I. DuPont deNemours co., for the United States Government, to make smokeless gunpowder for the Allied Armies in World War I. By the time of the Armistice Nov. 11, 1918, the plant, 75% complete, was producing 750,000 lbs of powder every 24 hours.

Location: Old Hickory, Swinging Bridge Rd & Cinder Rd
Erected: 1970

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Old Hickory Triangle

This intersection, known as “The Triangle,” served as the commercial core of Old Hickory from the 1920s through the 1940s. A variety of shops were located here, including a grocery, bank, general store, barber shop, restaurants, and doctors’ offices, as well as the bus station and YMCA. The Public Works Administration built the Colonial Revival Post Office in 1934-35.

Location: Old Hickory Village Triangle
Erected: 2002

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Parmer School

In 1927 8.25 acres of the Belle Meade Plantation were acquired from its owner Walter O. Parmer to use for a new school. Parmer School opened that fall as a one-room school with grades 1-3. In 1928 the school was transformed into a modern brick building with 4 classrooms adding grades 4-8. By 1951 there were 18 classrooms. The school closed in 1982 and burned in 1985. The stone and brick archway was left as a reminder of the school’s history. The property became a public park in 1986.

Location: Parmer Park on Leake Avenue
Erected: 2008

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Percy Warner Park - 2058.1 acres

Percy Warner (1861-1927) was a pioneer in electric utilities and hydroelectric development in the South. As chairman of the Park Board, he expanded Nashville’s park system. Preservation of this natural area was one of his greatest civic projects. Named in his honor by the Park Board in 1927, this land constitutes the largest municipal park in Tennessee.

Location: Belle Meade Boulevard at Warner Park entrance
Erected: 1982

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Powder-Grinding Wheels

These wheels used by the Confederacy to grind gunpowder at Augusta, Ga. in 1863-1864 were made in Woolwich, England and were shipped on the blockade runner “Spray,” via Mobile. After the war Gen. Miles purchased them for use at Sycamore Powder Mills, Cheatham County. They were exhibited at the Tennessee Centennial Exposition in 1897.

Location: Near present position of wheels in Centennial Park
Erected: 1969

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Radnor College

Two blocks west, on the hill, stood Radnor, a college for young women. Founded by A.N. Eshman in 1906, it gained national attention for its complimentary educational tours for students. After the school closed in 1914, a printing plant on campus served until 1924 as the Cumberland Presbyterian Publishing House. In 1921, a spectacular fire claimed the college’s main building.

Location: corner of Nolensville Road and McClellan Street
Erected: 1996

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RCA Studio B

RCA Records established a recording studio in this building in November 1957, with local offices run by guitarist-producer Chet Atkins. Its success led to a larger studio, known as Studio A, built next door in 1964. Studio B recorded numerous hits by Elvis Presley, the Everly Brothers, Roy Orbison, Don Gibson, Charley Pride, Jim Reeves, Dolly Parton, and many others. Along with Bradley Studios, Studio B is known for developing “The Nashville Sound.” DONATED BY THE MIKE CURB FOUNDATION

Erected: 2011

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Richland-West End

This early planned subdivision presents a largely unaltered picture of suburban residences in early 20th century Nashville. With ninety percent of existing homes built between 1905 and 1925, the styles range from large American foursquares to the more modest bungalows and cottages. The neighborhood is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

Location: To be determined
Erected: 2008

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Ryman Auditorium

Built 1891 as Union Gospel Tabernacle for religious revival meetings. Renamed Ryman Auditorium 1905 for steamboat captain Tom Ryman, the building’s chief contributor. The greates musician’s, actors, dancers, speakers, made the Ryman “the most famous one-night stand on the road.” bought 1963 by WSM’s Grand Ole Opry which first performed here in 1941.

Location: Front wall of building
Erected: 1969

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Saint Cecilia Academy

The name Saint Cecilia, patroness of music was chosen for a grammar and high school for girls, opened in October 1860 by four sisters who had moved to this site from Saint Mary’s convent, Third Order of Saint Dominic, Somerset, Ohio on August 17, 1860. The central building was completed in 1862, the west wing in 1880, and the east wing in 1913.
Correction: The east wing was built in 1903.

Location: Dominica & 8th Ave. N
Erected: 1971

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St. Patrick Catholic Church

Erected in 1890 and named for Ireland's patron saint, this Second Empire style church was built to serve South Nashville's growing Irish Catholic population. Until 1954, the Sisters of Mercy taught a grade school here. Since the 1890s, the Irish Travelers, a unique clan of American nomads, have come here periodically for weddings and funerals.

Location: 1219 Second Avenue South

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Saint Thomas Hospital

On April 11, 1898, at the request of Nashville Bishop Thomas Byrne, the Daughters of Charity opened Saint Thomas Hospital on this site in the former home of Judge J. M. Dickinson. Named for Byrne’s patron saint, the hospital began as a 26-bed “refuge for the sick,” opened a new building in 1902, operated a School of Nursing, and grew to 333 beds before moving in 1974 to 4220 Harding Road.

Opposite side: Engraving of Saint Thomas Hospital

Location: Hayes Street and 20th Avenue North
Erected: 1997

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Scottsboro/Bells Bend (Two-sided Marker)

Scottsboro

In 1869, Tom Scott opened a general store 500 yards to the southwest on Old Hyde’s Ferry Pike that also served as a post office and public gathering place. Scott’s Store became the center of this farming community, which stretches north to Joelton and south to the tip of Bells Bend. The unincorporated crossroads community was called Scott’s Store until 1902, when it was renamed Scottsboro.

Bells Bend

Bells Bend, first known as White’s Bend, is an 18-square-mile area encompassed by a U-shaped bend in the Cumberland River. Numerous archaeological sites indicate that the area has been inhabited for at least 10,000 years. Bells Bend has thrived as an agricultural community since the early 19th century with land owners that included Montgomery Bell and David Lipscomb. The Clees family operated a mill and ferry service beginning in the 1870’s. Clees Ferry ceased operation in 1990.

Location: Old Hickory Blvd @ Ashland City Highway
Erected: 2009

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The Seeing Eye, Independence and Dignity Since 1929

The Seeing Eye, the world-famous dog guide training school, was incorporated in Nashville January 29, 1929, with headquarters in the Fourth and First National Bank Building at 315 Union St. Morris Frank, a 20-year-old blind man from Nashville, and his guide dog, Buddy, played a key role in the school’s founding and subsequent success. It was Frank who persuaded Dorothy Harrison Eustis to establish a school in the United States.

Location: Commerce Street @ 3rd Avenue North
Erected: 2009

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Site of First Store

Lardner Clark came from Philadelphia in the early 1780’s with ten horses packed with piece goods, needles and pins. He established Nashville’s first dry goods store by 1786, on a site 30 yards east. The building which served as store, tavern and dwelling, faced south and was known as “the house with the piazza.”
1786 date incorrect. Should have been 1783, per
documentation on file.

Location: NE corner of 2nd Ave N & Banks St.
Erected: 1968

Note: Davidson County records show Lardner Clark suing customers for unpaid bills as early as 1783.

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Site of Original Gas Works

The Nashville Gas Light Co., founded March 1850, with General Washington Barrow, President, built first gas works in Tennessee for manufacturing gas from coal. First street lamp was lighted Feb. 13, 1851 at Second Ave. North and Public Square. First gas stove was used in 1894. Natural gas piped from Texas was first used in Nashville on August 5, 1946.

Location: 800 2nd Ave. N
Erected: 1971

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Site of Waterworks Plant

The city’s present waterworks was inaugurated at this site Oct. 1, 1833. The pumping station was erected on the lower river bluff and the reservoir on the upper grounds. German engineer, Albert Stein, designed and supervised construction. The system cost $55,000, the first bonded debt of the city. A new plant was in operation & this site was abandoned by Apr. 1891.

Location: Hermitage Ave @ General Hospital
Erected: 1975
(This marker is currently down due to site development and slated for reinstallation at a later date.)

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Sunnyside

Home of Mary Benton, widow of Jesse Benton who left Nashville after a famous feud with Andrew Jackson in 1813. The Greek Revival house was built c.1852 and stood between Union and Confederate lines during the Battle of Nashville in 1864. Prominent dentist L.G. Noel lived here for 45 years. The brick wings were added by Col. Granville Sevier during renovation of the house in the late 1920s.

Location: Sevier Park, 3000 Granny White Pike
Erected: replacement marker 2004

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Tanglewood Historic District

The Tanglewood Historic District is a rustic style suburban development from the 1920-1940s built by Robert M. Condra, a prominent Nashville builder. Natural materials are featured in this popular Arts and Crafts substyle that harmonizes with the landscape. Tanglewood is located at the site of a late 1700s settlement known as Haysborough.

Location: Madison, 4908 Tanglewood Drive North
Erected: 2002

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The Temple Cemetery

The Temple Cemetery was established in 1851 with the purchase of three acres by the Hebrew Benevolent Burial Association and still serves Nashville’s first Jewish congregation, The Temple, Congregation Ohabai Sholom. It blends early urban burial ground practices with picturesque elements of later Victorian garden cemeteries. The Temple Cemetery was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 2004.

Location: Temple Cemetery, 2001 15th Avenue North
Erected: 2004

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Tennessee Ornithological Society

On October 7, 1915, Dr. George Curtis, Albert F. Ganier, Judge H.Y. Hughes, Dr. George R. Mayfield, Dixon Merritt, and A.C. Webb met at Faucon’s Restaurant, 419 Union Street, approximately 25 feet east of here, to found the Tennessee Ornithological Society. T.O.S. was chartered by the state for the purpose of studying Tennessee birds. A journal, The Migrant, publishes accurate records of birds across the state. The Birds of the Nashville Area has local records. T.O.S. is the state’s oldest conservation group in continuing existence. Donated in memory of B.B. Coffey (1870-1966).

Location: Union Street and 5th Ave No. wall marker
Erected: 1992

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Tennessee State University

Tennessee Agricultural & Industrial State Normal School for Negroes first opened its doors to 247 students in 1912. this site gave birth to a new era--Public Higher Education for Negroes in the state of Tennessee with emphasis on Agricultural & Industrial occupations. In 1922 the school was raised to college status & to a university in 1951.

Location: TSU Campus, 2904 John A Merritt Bv.
Erected: 1976

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Tolbert Hollow

George Tolbert, a farmer, bought 97½ acres here in 1897 that became known as Tolbert Hollow. He was a former slave who, according to family tradition, purchased his own freedom. Tolbert worked 45 acres by 1880 and cut and sold wood with his sons. Land ownership signified true freedom for blacks after the Civil War. Generations of Tolbert’s descendants continued to live on his land.

Location: 576 Old Hickory Boulevard.
Erected: 2003

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Transfer Station Site

Site of electric street railway transfer station 1902-1940. Electric streetcar service began formally on April 30, 1889 replacing mule-drawn streetcars which had served the city since 1866. Final run for the electric streetcars was Feb. 2, 1941 on Radnor line. Operation of bus system began Aug. 4, 1940 on Hillsboro-Sunset line.

Location: Near 3rd Ave entrance to Commerce-Union Parking Garage
Erected: 1970

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Una Community

The Una community developed around the crossroads of Smith springs road and Old Murfreesboro Pike in the early 19th century. The local postmaster changed the community name from Rowesdale, or Rosedale, to Una in 1882, honoring a Peabody college student much loved by local residents. Home to schools, churches, a general store, and a service station, this bustling tightly-knit rural community was supplanted by suburban development by the end of the 20th century.

Sponsored by Metro Council member Vivian Wilhoite

Location: Smith Springs Rd & Old Murfreesboro Rd
Erected: 2008

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Two Rivers Mansion

Built in 1859 by David H. McGavock, this mansion stands on land inherited by McGavock’s wife, Willie, from her father, William Harding. The smaller house to the left was built in 1802. Dr. James Priestley’s Academy, established about 1816, was located on the 1,100 acre farm 1 mile from the mansion on the Cumberland River bluff.

Location: In front of Two Rivers Mansion on McGavock Pike.
Erected: 1968

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Union Station

Erected by the Louisville & Nashville Terminal Co. & dedicated Oct. 9, 1900, the Romanesque style building of Bowling Green Gray stone and Tennessee marble was designed by L & N Chief Eng. Richard Montfort. The past grandeur of the structure is still evident in the ornate fresco figures, stained glass windows & elaborate wrought iron decoration.

Location: Replaced by Marker # 84 in 1999
Erected: 1971

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United Nations Visit to Nashville

On June 7, 1976, 101 permanent representatives of the United Nations made a historic and unprecedented group visit to Nashville at the invitation of Tennessee Governor Ray Blanton and Nashville Mayor Richard Fulton. During the visit, the United Nations representatives attended a forum at nearby Vanberbilt University, a special Tennessee luncheon in Centennial Park, and a special performance of the Grand Ole Opry. United Nations Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim was presented the Cordell Hull Peace award by the state of Tennessee and Vanderbilt University during the visit.

Location: Centennial Park, front lawn of Parthenon
Erected: 1976

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University School of Nashville

Founded in 1915 as the successor to The Winthrop Model School at the University of Nashville, Peabody Demonstration School was established at this site in 1925 to utilize the teacher training methods developed at George Peabody College for Teachers. It became an independent institution in 1975 and was renamed University School of Nashville.

Location: 2000 Edgehill Avenue
Erected: 1992

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Vauxhall Garden Site

Located immediately south, this fashionable place of entertainment was established by Messrs. Decker & Dyer in 1827 and operated for more than a decade. It covered several acres & included a ballroom, dining hall and miniature railroad. Pres. Jackson was honored here on several occasions. John Bell made his famous “Vauxhall Garden Speech” here May 23, 1835.

Location: Demonbreun St. & 9th Ave. S
Erected: 1975

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Votes for Women

On August 18, 1920, Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, thereby giving all American women the right to vote. After weeks of intense lobbying by national leaders, Tennessee passed the measure by one vote. The headquarters for both suffragists, wearing yellow roses,
and anti-suffragists, wearing red roses, were in the Hermitage Hotel.

Location: Union Street and Capitol Boulevard
Erected: 1995

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Wallace University School, 1886-1941

To prepare young men for college & for life, believing the first object of education to develop character, the second to develop intellect, third to make Christian gentlemen, Wallace University School, directed by Professor Clarence B Wallace, flourished on this site, 1914-1941. Graduates entered universities without taking the usual examinations.

Location: SW crnr, 2000 West End Avenue
Erected: 1971

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Ward's Seminary

Ward’s Seminary for Young Ladies, founded in 1865 by Dr. William E. Ward, stood at this site many years. Dr. Ward, a graduate of Cumberland University in Lebanon in both law and divinity, died in 1887. The school was sold, but continued to operate as Ward’s Seminary until 1913 when it merged with Belmont college to form Ward-Belmont, a high school and junior college for women. Ward’s was regarded as one of the leading
schools for young women in the South.

Location: 169 8th Avenue North, wall mounted
Erected: 2001

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Watkins Park

Land once known as Watkins Grove was given to the city in 1870 by brick maker and contractor Samuel Watkins. It served as a site for political gatherings, school commencements and concerts. This became Nashville’s first public park in 1901. Park Board chairman E.C. Lewis planned landscape features including a stone entrance and fence, walkways, flowerbeds, and benches, which were built with materials donated by citizens. In 1906, the Centennial Club opened the city’s first playground here, setting a precedent for public recreation facilities elsewhere in the city. Improved by the Works Progress Administration in the 1930s, Watkins Park was a park for black Nashvillians from 1936 until the 1960s, when the park system was desegregated.

Location: 616 17th Avenue North, Watkins Park
Erected: 2005

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Waverly Place

On the high ground about 100 yards east stood Waverly, home of A.W. Putman, writer and authority on pioneer James Robertson. Hence the name “Waverly Place” which resulted from a syndicate promotion in the 1880s by J. F. Yarbrough, H. W. Grantland, W. M. Morrison, John White, Baxter Smith, C. L. Ridley, Percy Warner, J. C. Warner and J. F. Wheless.

Note: One of the names appearing on the marker is thought to be incorrect. W.M. Morrow is said to have been a member of the syndicate which promoted Waverly Place. City directories of the period list W.H. Morrow”.

Location: 8th Ave S and Benton Avenue
Erected: 1976

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West End High School

One of Nashville’s best examples of Colonial Revival style, this building was designed by Donald Southgate and opened in 1937. Public Works Administration funds supported its construction during a major city school building project of the 1930s. Principals William H. Yarbrough (1937-54) and John A. Oliver (1955-68) built a reputation for academic and athletic excellence. It became a middle school in 1968.

Donated by the West End High School
Alumni Association, Inc.

Location: West End Middle School, Elmington Park, 3529 West End Ave.
Erected: 2003

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"Western Harmony"

Music publishing in Nashville began in 1824 when “The Western Harmony” was published by Allen D. Carden and Samuel J. Rogers. A book of hymns and instruction for singing, it was printed by Carey A. Harris on the press of his newspaper, the Nashville Republican, on College Street (now Third Avenue) in this vicinity.

Location: 3rd Ave. N & James Robertson Pkwy
Erected: 1981
(This marker was damaged and removed, to be replaced at a later date.)

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William Gerst Brewing Company

The Nashville Brewery opened here in 1859 operating under several names and owners until William Gerst acquired it in 1893. Gerst brewed some of the South’s finest ales and lagers until Prohibition, when sodas and malt beverages were bottled. William Gerst died in 1933, the year prohibition ended, and his four sons resumed operations using the popular “Brewed in Dixie” slogan. Gerst Brewery closed in 1954 due to national competition.

Location: Not erected as of this date

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Woodbine

An early settler of this area was James Menees, at whose home Mill Creek Baptist Church was formed in 1797. James Whitsett, first pastor, served over 50 years. Earlier known as Flat Rock, in 1939 this place was renamed Woodbine, after the David Hughes Estate once located on Nolensville Road. In 1919 the L&N RR began operation of Radnor Yards.

Location: Nolensville Rd & Whitsett Ave.
Erected: 1975

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Woodmont Estates

Created in 1937 from the G. A. Puryear farm. It was once part of Samuel Watkin’s country estate. Olmsted Bros. Landscape Architects designed the roads and lots to flow naturally with the hills, valleys, and brook. Residential development was made possible by the 1915 construction of a concrete road. Known by 1918 the first documented concrete road in Tennessee.

Location: West Valley Brook and Bear Road
Erected: 1999

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