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Police Department

Park Smart Program

Park Smart Sign - Lock your vehicle, secure your valuables, take keys with you

More than half of the auto theft reports in Davidson County each week routinely reveal that the vehicles taken were easy targets because the keys were left inside or made available to thieves. Since 2000, the Metro Nashville Police Department has been urging citizens to “Park Smart” with a campaign to prevent auto theft.  Continuing the commitment, we are teaming up with Tennessee Highway Patrol, Clarksville Police, Hendersonville Police, Mt. Juliet Police and others to stress auto theft prevention.

Professional thieves can steal any car, but make them work for yours.  Lock your vehicle and keep track of your keys. Getting into a cold car or hot car might be uncomfortable.  That is nothing compared to the hassle you will go through if your car is stolen.

A continuing community concern is the theft of items from the interior of motor vehicles.  An iPad or cell phone sitting on the passenger’s seat of your car is eye-candy to a criminal.  Even loose change is enough to invite some to break in. Remove valuables or hide them out of eyesight.

Metro Police Auto Theft Unit

It’s the Law

Unattended Motor Vehicle (12.40.200)

Required Procedures:

NO person driving or in charge of a motor vehicle shall permit it to stand unattended without first stopping the engine, locking the ignition, removing the key from the ignition, effectively setting the brake thereon and, when standing upon any grade, turning the front wheel to the curb or side of the highway.

Unattended Motor Vehicles (55-8-162)

Unattended vehicles containing medical or hazardous waste—Penalty and liability.

(a) NO person driving or in charge of a motor vehicle shall permit it to stand unattended without first stopping the engine, locking the ignition, and effectively setting the brake thereon and, when standing upon any grade, turning the front wheels to the curb or side of the highway.

The Tennessee Court of Appeals has ruled that a person leaving the keys in their vehicle can be held responsible for a car thief’s crash.  The court further stated that “it did not matter whether the keys were left in the ignition or the front seat or on the dashboard in plain view.