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Art WORKS Metro Office Building Collection

On December 22, 1978, Mayor Richard Fulton signed the ordinance which established the Metropolitan Nashville Arts Commission. In 2018, Metro Arts' "40 for 40" project marked the agency's 40th anniversary with the purchase of artworks by 40 artists for the Historic Metro Courthouse and the Metro Office Building. These new works join 50 other pieces that form the city’s “One Percent for Art” public art collection. This new program is a key recommendation in Metro Arts’ Public Art Community Investment Plan adopted in spring 2017. For more information on "40 for 40" and the Art WORKS Collection, please contact Anne-Leslie Owens anne-leslie.owens@nashville.gov.

Viewing the Artworks

The Metro Office Building is located at 800 Second Avenue, South and the artwork is available for viewing during normal business hours. The artworks are listed below starting with the First Floor and ending at the Fourth Floor, though you may view them in any order. An elevator is located in the center of the building just past the main entrance.

First Floor

Mill Creek Near Demonbreun’s Cave

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John Guider

2015

Archival digital print

View from the Old Tennessee State Prison

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John Guider

2014

Archival digital print

As a photographer in an urban setting, the artist avoids familiar viewpoints and ventures off the beaten path. Many of the views he captures can only be seen by water.

Second Floor

Adjusting the Perspective

Artwork located in the Nash Conference Room

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Marilyn Murphy

2011

Graphite on paper

Timing and Lighting

Artwork located in the Davidson Conference Room

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Marilyn Murphy

2016

Graphite on paper

This artist’s works comment upon the act of seeing, the creative process, or some aspect of human relationships. Strong lighting and shadows in these works create a sense of mystery while the identities of the men and women are obscured in order to direct the focus of the viewer toward their activity.

Third Floor

Exit at Grimey’s Basement

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Paul Collins

2018

Ink (posca pen) on paper

Idle Bloom at Grimey’s Basement

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Paul Collins

2018

Ink (posca pen) on paper

The Weaves at Grimey’s Basement

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Paul Collins

2018

Ink (posca pen) on paper

Back of the Crowd at Grimey’s Basement

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Paul Collins

2018

Ink (posca pen) on paper

This series of on-site drawings at Grimey’s basement music venue is an effort to capture the changing Nashville cityscape. The artist went every night for a few weeks, working in the crowd and drawing any and every band and the scenes that unfolded.

Keeping Secrets

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Elizabeth Sanford

2018

Mixed media

Reshaping the Shadows: Unseen Omens II

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Elizabeth Sanford

2014

Mixed media

These works are visual fairy tale inspired by neighborhood walks and hikes in Warner Parks. They are reminders of the importance of green spaces for community recreation and as habitats for native plants and animals.

Honky Tonk 18

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Michael Ray Nott

2018

Archival photo print

Steel Player 16

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Michael Ray Nott

2016

Archival photo print

Capturing the vibrancy of downtown Nashville, these works document of the unexpected, haphazard multitude of things – neon signs, buildings, random people – all colliding in a rush of activity. These are photos documenting the people and the music that make up Music City USA.

Fourth Floor

One Day… (Mrs. Teacher of the Year)

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Thaxton Waters II

2015

Acrylic paint on aged wood

Referencing the artist’s childhood in North Nashville, the symbols placed throughout the painting are elements of home life, 80's/90's pop culture, and the political, social, and economic ideas that permeated society.

Tough Boys

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David S. Piñeros

2017

Archival photo print

LGBT Liberation

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David S. Piñeros

2018

Archival photo print

These works document ordinary people and their social interactions in juxtaposition with some of the intimate social issues of Nashville; as a city immersed in the “Bible Belt,” and overwhelmed by its record growth.

In Awe of Mother Earth

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Katherine Krebs

2017

Mixed media on panel

Divine Channel

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Katherine Krebs

2017

Mixed media on panel

This body of work focuses on transitions in the artist’s personal life, society, humanity, religion and the connection between them. The artist explores our connection to each other, God, the divine feminine, the heavens, and history.

Edgehill Polar Bear

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James R. Threalkill

2018

Acrylic on canvas

The Edgehill Polar Bears were a favorite image from the artist’s childhood growing up in the Edgehilll community. As a proud former resident, the artist wanted to pay homage to the polar bears and the neighborhood identity they embody.

The Sum and the Parts

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Mandy Rogers Horton

2018

Mixed media painting

This work reflects on the ongoing construction of our lives and culture from eclectic and disparate+ sources. We are in constant negotiations—what should go, what will remain? The process is always, for all of us, ongoing.

In the Out Door

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Robert Durham

2007

Oil on linen

The artist’s subjects, often portrayed with humor, act to illuminate and bring under examination the communities in which they find themselves. In doing so, it may stimulate and help develop new and improved ideas as to the constant reformulation of how we as individuals within a community choose to coexist with each other.

Voices of Nashville, Circa 1984

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John Baeder

2013

Archival digital print

This work is part of the artist’s “American Roadside” series from the early 1980s. While capturing iconic scenes of the Nashville’s social and cultural history, he came to see the city as “nothing but comfort from the beginning. It’s magical, spiritual, and soft.”