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Learn About the Metro Nashville Budget

Budget Timeline

Winter

January: The Mayor’s Office determines the Direction of the Budget for the City and its Citizens. Finance Director releases the budget message. The Mayor, Director of Finance and the Finance Department's Office of Management and Budget evaluate each department's options and conduct individual department hearings to prepare the Recommended Budget.

January/February: Agencies, Departments, and Elected Officials prepare budget requests. Departments then put their request and revenue estimates into the budget system.

March: The Mayor's Hearings with Agencies, Departments and Elected Officials are held.

Spring

By May 1: The Mayor and/or the Finance Director present the Recommended Budget to the Metro Council. The Chairman of the Budget and Finance Committee files the budget and tax levy ordinances. The Office of Management and Budget prepares the Recommended Budget Book for Council's review.

April to June: The Council and the Budget and Finance Committee conduct public hearings as well as hearings with each individual department. The budget is approved on three readings and may be amended or substituted on the third reading. The Office of Management and Budget prepares substitute budget ordinances for the Budget and Finance Committee as required.

June 30: The Council passes the budget ordinances, and the Mayor signs the budget ordinances into law. If the Council fails to pass a balanced budget by June 30, the Recommended Budget and tax rates take effect by default.

Summer/Fall

July 1: New fiscal year begins and department ledgers are loaded, and services are provided to the citizens. The Office of Management and Budget prepares and distributes the final Budget Book. Accounts closes books, the Audit Board selects independent certified public accountants to perform an annual post audit, and Accounts prepares and issues a Comprehensive Annual Financial Report.

Throughout the Fiscal Year: Each department uses their budget to deliver services. The Finance Department, especially Accounts and the Office of Management and Budget, monitor departmental budgets.

December: Each department prepares budget options for review by the Office of Management and Budget.

Where Metro Nashville's Budget Money Comes From

The $2.45 billion Fiscal Year 2021 budget for the Metropolitan Government’s six budgetary (tax-supported) funds supports a wide range of public services. This budget represents a 4.97% increase from the Fiscal Year 2020 budget.

Property Taxes: Property Taxes: 58.76%, Local Option Sales Tax: 14.39%, Grants and Contributions: 17.17%, Fund Balance Appropriated: 0.0%, All Other Revenues: 9.68%

Property Taxes: 58.76%
Local Option Sales Tax: 14.39%
Grants and Contributions: 17.17%
Fund Balance Appropriated: 0.0%
All Other Revenues: 9.68%

Where Metro Nashville's Budget Money Goes

The $2.45 billion Fiscal Year 2021 budget for the Metropolitan Government’s six budgetary (tax-supported) funds supports a wide range of public services. This budget represents a 4.97% increase from the Fiscal Year 2020 budget.

Where the money goes pie chart: Education: 37%, Public Safety: 20%, General Government: 11%, Debt Service: 14%, Health and Social Services: 4%, Infrastructure and Transportation: 4%, Recreation and Culture: 4%, Cash and Fund Balance Restoration: 4%, Other: 2%

Education: 37%
Public Safety: 20%
General Government: 11%
Debt Service: 14%
Health and Social Services: 4%
Infrastructure and Transportation: 4%
Recreation and Culture: 4%
Cash and Fund Balance Restoration: 4%
Other: 2%

Budget Glossary

The annual operating budget contains specialized and technical terminology. This glossary defines some of the more common and more important of these terms.