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Daily Metro COVID19 Press Update for May 8

5/8/2020
Chris Song

Mayor John Cooper’s office issued the following announcements regarding Metro’s citywide coronavirus (COVID-19) monitoring and response efforts in coordination with area hospitals, healthcare providers, medical colleges, and other community partners.

Metro Public Health Department

Metro Public Health Department officials announced today a total number of 3,460 confirmed cases of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Nashville/Davidson County, an increase of 28 in the past 24 hours.

The confirmed cases range in age from 2 months to 99 years.

A total of thirty-five (35) people have died after a confirmed case of COVID-19. 1,810 individuals have recovered from the virus.

The MPHD COVID-19 Hotline received 195 calls on Wednesday, May 7, 2020.

Total number of cases: 3,460

Cases reported in the past 24 hours: 28

Cases by sex

  • Male: 1,751
  • Female: 1,530
  • Unknown: 179

Total Cases by age

Age Group (years) Number of Cases
Unknown 67
0-10 87
11-20 247
21-30 868
31-40 674
41-50 537
51-60 470
61-70 301
71-80 140
81+ 69
Total 3,460
Recovered 1,810
Deaths 35
Total active cases 1,615
  • Total number of tests administered: 34,160
  • Total positive results: 3,460
  • Total negative results: 30,700
  • Positive results as percentage of total: 10.1%

Health officials remind everyone to take steps to stop the spread of germs like COVID-19. These include:

  • Practice social distancing as defined by the CDC (6 feet of distance from others). Do not gather in groups larger than 10.
  • Wear a cloth face covering when in a community setting, especially in situations where you may be near people. These settings include grocery stores and pharmacies. These face coverings are not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay at home, unless leaving your home is absolutely necessary because you have medical needs or are an essential worker.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

Utilities

Metro Public Works

This information is current as of 5/7/2020 at 7:30 p.m.

Public Works currently has 6 crews out clearing downed trees and debris from the right of ways in the affected areas.

Since the storm occurred on 5/3/2020:

  • Public Works has received a total of 491 tree/debris calls obstructing roadways and alleys.
  • Public Works crews have removed/cleared a total of 460 tree/debris calls obstructing the roadway.
  • Public Works crews have removed/cleared debris and trees obstructing 31 alleys.
  • 8 calls are waiting on NES response to remove power lines from downed trees.
  • 52 total Signal Construction calls have been completed.
  • 6 Signal outages have been reported (due to loss of power).
  • No temporary stop signs are currently installed.

Nashville Electric Service

This information is current as of 5/7/2020 at 8:00 p.m.

  • Number of Outages: 3,544
  • Number of Customers Restored: 128,165 since Sunday; 1,857 customers have been restored since the 3:30 update.
  • Number of Customers Without Power at Storm’s Peak: 131,709, due to the severe wind event that moved through the entire Nashville Electric Service service area

Additional updates:

  • The number of damaged power poles has increased to 250. Crews have completed assessment of broken poles and don’t anticipate this number to rise.
  • Crews have completed all major circuit repairs. Tomorrow’s focus will be on outages impacting fewer than 100 customers and pole replacement.
  • Crews will continue to work 14-hour shifts, around the clock, until all power is restored.
  • Nashville Electric Service Outage Map

Residential Customer Accommodations

NES is suspending all power disconnections for non-payment until June 30. NES will absorb late fees and credit card fees on behalf of our customers until June 30. Customers in need of an extended payment arrangement are asked to contact Customer Relations by calling 615-736-6900.

Commercial Customer Accommodations

Through June 30, general power commercial customers (large commercial time of use specialty rates excluded) will not receive a minimum demand charge on their bill. Demand charges will be based on measured demand. For more information on minimum demand, please see our commercial rate schedules. NES will offer advice to help businesses manage their energy demand when they are preparing to reopen to minimize the potential impact on their bill.

Safer at Home: Ways to Pay Your NES Bill

  • NES-bill: Receive and pay your bill online using your bank account by logging into My Account at nespower.com. Set up automatic payments with AutoPay. No fees ever.
  • One-Time Payment: Pay your bill by credit/debit card or bank account. No login required. You will need your NES account number. NES is covering the $2.25 processing fee until June 30, 2020.
  • Pay by Phone: Pay your bill by credit/debit card or bank account. You will need your NES account number. NES is covering the $2.25 processing fee until June 30, 2020.
  • Pay by Mail: Pay your bill by check or money order. Please include the bill stub with your payment in the envelope provided.
  • Automatic Transfer (NEAT): Enable recurring payments so your account is automatically deducted every month. This program is separate from AutoPay with NES E-bill.

Guidance for Communities of Faith

Guidance for Davidson County Religious Communities

The prudence and cooperation of our faith-based communities has been an important part of the progress we have made in our efforts against COVID-19. While we continue to recognize the hardship placed on persons of faith who desire to worship freely and in community, we also recognize the health risks presented by any physical assemblies, including worship gatherings or related assemblies, during the pandemic. To be clear, while we are taking measured steps to open up Nashville, the Covid-19 pandemic is far from over and will be with us for the foreseeable future.

We are particularly mindful that many persons of faith, including our most vulnerable, deem communal religious observance to be essential (and perhaps obligatory), regardless of the health risk to themselves and others. As a result, while we urge congregations to continue to refrain from communal worship services, we are aware that some will choose to resume such services.

We have been asked to provide guidance to those congregations that wish to physically gather for worship. We are mindful that such gatherings are especially inadvisable for persons over age 65 and those with certain underlying health conditions. Written with our valued assemblies in mind, these guidelines are based on recommendations by the CDC and our local Health Department. 

  1. General Guidelines: Due to the unique relationship between religious communities and their congregants, these communities have a heightened responsibility to protect their congregants who will deem religious services essential despite the risk such gatherings pose to their personal health and the health of those with whom they come into contact. As a result, we urge religious congregations to:
    • Continue online worship services.
    • Plan on a maximum capacity of 1 person per 200 square feet of space. This ratio applies to each worship space, teaching space, and other gathering space.
    • Urge congregants/members with children under age 2 (who are deemed too young to wear facial coverings) and those over age 65 to continue to shelter at home and to take advantage of online services.
    • Urge all vulnerable congregants and those who have contact with vulnerable populations to continue to refain from attending in-person religious services.
    • Demonstrate leadership by always wearing facial coverings in public. Require that congregants wear face coverings while arriving, attending, or departing from services.
  2. Communication with your Congregants. Please communicate often with your congregants both before and after you re-open. It is strongly recommended that you include your social distancing policy and cleaning protocols on your website, on social media, and by your other usual means of communication to assist your congregants in determining when it is safe for them to attend.
  3. Signage. Be sure that you have signage throughout your facility that complies with the Health Department order regarding signage. Staff or congregants should be reminded of the evolving COVID-19 symptoms and should be urged to stay at home or leave if they are experiencing any symptoms. Congregants should be urged to notify their religious community if they are COVID-positive and attended worship service or other events at that location in the preceding 14 days or as recommended by their healthcare provider or the Health Department.
  4. Cleaning. Before a religious space reopens, these safety precautions should be in place and clearly communicated to your congregants and staff:
    • Hand sanitizer or sanitizing materials, compliant with CDC standards, should be available to everyone in common areas. Signage and/or staff should be deployed to encourage the use of hand sanitizer.
    • Regularly sanitize and disinfect high touchpoint areas (e.g., doors, seating, lecterns, microphones, altars, trash receptacles).
    • Provide enhanced sanitizing and disinfecting every evening after the organization closes for the day.
    • All sanitizing and disinfecting should be performed with CDC-compliant cleaning products and protocols.
    • While temperature checks of congregants are up to each congregation, if you choose to do this, thermometers should be purchased.
  5. Changes to Consider. Throughout the course of this pandemic, you will need to stay abreast of recommendations from the Health Department. Current recommendations include:
    • Wearing of facial coverings and gloves by greeters. Greeters should avoid contact with entering participants, but can assist with social distancing protocols and keeping doors propped open and/or clean.
    • Seating together congregants only who share living spaces.
    • Establishing a social distancing plan (with signage) that addresses:
      • Keeping congregants/families six feet apart from others.
      • Removing or blocking off seating to comply with capacity guidelines.
      • Establishing ingress and egress protocols that comply with social distancing norms. Organizations should consider dismissing congregants by zone in order to avoid close proximity at exits.
      • Offering more services/shorter services to reduce crowding.
    • Storing away hymnals, religious ye, and other shared religious items.
    • Using collection boxes at entrances/exits in lieu of collection baskets or plates.
    • Focusing on worship services and avoiding social gatherings.
    • Having a plan for weddings, baptisms, funerals, and other religious ceremonies that comply with social distancing guidelines.

Resources for Businesses

Roadmap for Reopening Business Questions

Do you have questions about the Roadmap for Reopening your business? Please review the order, toolkit, etc. before submitting a question.

Submit a Question about the Roadmap for Reopening your business

Restaurants and Bars – Phase One Reopening

What must I do at all times?

  • All businesses or facilities open to the public shall post conspicuous signage at all public entrances in accordance with Public Health Order 4.
  • Encourage everyone inside your establishment to observe CDC Guidelines for social distancing and proper hygiene.
  • Restrict occupancy to no more than 50% of the posted maximum occupancy for each dining area.
  • Bar areas must remain closed to the public; the bar may be used to prepare and service orders from patrons seated elsewhere. No interaction between the public and bartender is allowed
  • No ancillary or participatory activities including, but not limited to, arcade games, pool, foosball, darts, axe throwing, amusement rides, laser tag, or similar activities shall be allowed.
  • All employees who interact with the public or cannot maintain a safe social distance from their co-workers are required to wear a face covering or mask.

What should I do before opening?

  • Flush all water systems – Metro Water Services has posted flushing guidance on the COVID-19 website.
  • Reduce the capacity of your bar/restaurant.
    • Adequately space or close tables to provide for proper social distancing
    • Mark bar areas “Closed” or “Staff Only”
    • Mark indoor/outdoor waiting areas to provide for proper social distancing
    • Close self-serve buffets, condiment stations and beverage stations
    • Post signage to encourage proper social distancing in and around restrooms
  • Create or amend your employee protection policies and procedures to include:
    • Allowing employees to work from home as much as possible
    • Temperature and symptom screening questions for all employees reporting to work. An employee showing symptoms or a temperature of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or greater must leave the premises immediately.
    • Require all employees to wear face coverings or masks if they interact with the public or cannot maintain a safe social distance from their co-workers.
    • Adherence by all employees to CDC guidance on social distancing and hand sanitizing
    • Plan for a potential Covid-19 case or exposure
    • For employees who previously tested positive:
    • If the employee does NOT have symptoms, they must be at least 10 days past the day they were tested before being allowed to return to work.
    • If the employee HAS symptoms, they must be at least 10 days past when the symptoms began; they must be feeling better; AND they cannot have had a fever in the previous 72 hours DURING WHICH TIME they did not take any medication that reduces fever (Tylenol, Ibuprofen, acetaminophen, or ibuprofen) before being allowed to return to work.
    • Alternatively, if an employee who previously tested positive wants to confirm their status to return to work by further testing, they must have two negative tests at least 24 hours apart before being allowed to return to work.
      • For employees who have been in direct contact a positive case (they will usually have been contacted by public health officials in their county of residence with this information):
      • They must self-isolate for 14 days before returning to work. If they become symptomatic during this time, they should be tested. Refer employees who need to be tested to their personal medical provider or to a community assessment center. If they test positive, they should follow the information above.
      • For an employee has been tested and is awaiting results, the employee cannot return to work until the results are back. Before they can return to work, they must have both: A negative test result AND not have been a contact of a positive case within the previous 14 days.
    • All employees should stay home if feeling ill
    • Increased opportunities for hand washing
    • Adherence by vendors to the same policies put in place to help protect your employees
  • Create or amend your disinfection policies and procedures to include
    • Increased frequency of restroom sanitization
    • Use of disposable, virtual, or no-touch menus. Regular menus must be sanitized between each use.
    • Use of single service condiments, or sanitize regular table-service condiments between each use.
    • Increase sanitization of high-touch surfaces (doorknobs, handles, credit card machines, pens, etc.)
    • Sanitize chairs and tables after each customer
    • Sanitize any partitions or shields used to protect employees at greeter/host/hostess stands or payment stations
    • Sanitize all front-of-house contact surfaces each day
  • Place hand sanitizer stations in lobbies, bathrooms and at cashier stations

What should I do while my restaurant is open?

  • Restrict occupancy to no more than 50% of the maximum rated capacity for each dining area.
  • Follow your policies and procedures for employee protection and disinfection. CDC guidelines can change often; update your policy as needed
  • Bar areas must remain closed to the public; the bar may be used to prepare and service orders from patrons seated elsewhere. No interaction between the public and bartender is allowed.
  • Space customers apart. Use all the dining space available to you when seating your allowable capacity.
  • No live music or entertainment shall be allowed. Any dance floor shall remain closed to that purpose.
  • No party of more than six (6) people shall be allowed
  • Limit the number of people in an elevator to allow compliance with CDC guidance on social distancing
  • Self-service food and shared condiments are not allowed

For additional questions and other best practices, go to FAQs and Best Practices.

If you still have questions, go to HubNashville or call 311 within Davidson County.

Retail and Commercial Stores – Phase One Reopening

What must I do at all times?

  • All businesses or facilities open to the public shall post conspicuous signage at all public entrances in accordance with Public Health Order 4. Resources for Reopening
  • Encourage everyone inside your establishment to observe CDC Guidelines for social distancing and proper hygiene
  • Restrict occupancy to no more than 50% of the posted maximum occupancy for your operating space.
  • All employees who interact with the public or who cannot maintain a safe social distance from their co-workers are required to wear a face covering or mask.

What should I do before opening?

  • Flush all water systems – Metro Water Services has posted flushing guidance on the COVID-19 website
  • Reduce the capacity of your break rooms and common areas.
    • Adequately space tables to provide for proper social distancing
    • Mark indoor/outdoor waiting areas to provide for proper social distancing
    • Post signage to encourage proper social distancing in and around restrooms
  • Create or amend your employee protection policies to include:
    • Allowing employees to work from home as much as possible
    • Temperature and symptom screening questions for all employees reporting to work. Information on symptoms can be found at CDC guidelines for symptoms of COVID-19. An employee showing symptoms or a temperature of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or greater must leave the premises immediately
    • Require all employees who interact with the public or who cannot maintain a safe social distance from their co-workers to wear a face covering or mask
    • Adherence by all employees to CDC guidance on social distancing and hand sanitizing
    • Plan for a potential Covid-19 case
      • For employees who previously tested positive:
      • If the employee does NOT have symptoms, they must be at least 10 days past the day they were tested before being allowed to return to work.
      • If the employee HAS symptoms, they must be at least 10 days past when their symptoms began; they must be feeling better; AND they cannot have had a fever in the previous 72 hours DURING WHICH TIME they did not take any medication that reduces fever (Tylenol, Ibuprofen, acetaminophen, or ibuprofen) before being allowed to return to work.
      • Alternatively:
      • If an employee who previously tested positive wants to confirm their status to return to work by further testing, they must have two negative tests at least 24 hours apart before being allowed to return to work.
      • For employees who have been in direct contact a positive case (they will usually have been contacted by public health officials in their county of residence with this information):
      • They must self-isolate for 14 days before returning to work. If they become symptomatic during this time, they should be tested. Refer employees who need to be tested to their personal medical provider or to a community assessment center. If they test positive, they should follow the information above.
      • For an employee has been tested and is awaiting results, the employee cannot return to work until the results are back. Before they can return to work, they must have BOTH: A negative test result AND not have been a contact of a positive case within the previous 14 days.
    • All employees should stay home if feeling ill
    • Increased opportunities for hand washing
    • Adherence by vendors to the same policies put in place to help protect your employees
    • Stagger shifts, breaks and meals to allow for increased social distancing
  • Create or amend your disinfection policies and procedures to include:
    • Increased frequency of restroom sanitization
    • Increased sanitization of high-touch surfaces (doorknobs, handles, credit card machines, pens, etc.)
    • Sanitize any partitions or shields used to protect greeters and those employees at payment stations
    • Include plans for sanitizing all front-of-house contact surfaces each day
  • Place hand sanitizer stations in lobbies and other high traffic areas

What should I do while my business is open?

  • Limit the number of customers inside your store to 50% of the maximum rated capacity
  • Follow your policies and procedures for employee protection and disinfection. CDC guidelines can change often; update your policy as needed
  • Consider requiring customers to wear face coverings
  • Sanitize carts or baskets after each customer’s use.
  • Limit the number of people in an elevator to allow compliance with CDC guidance on social distancing.
  • Consider dedicated shopping hours or appointment times for the elderly, medically vulnerable and health care workers
  • Consider separate entrances and exits to encourage social distancing.
  • Consider one-way aisles or other traffic patterns to encourage social distancing
  • Consider dedicating a management-level employee to ensuring customer and employee compliance with social distancing guidelines
  • Increase curbside, pickup and delivery options to minimize contact
  • Increase social distancing reminders such as signs and audio announcements
  • Suspend sampling of food or personal hygiene products; limit self-service options.

For additional questions and other best practices, go to FAQs and Best Practices.

If you still have questions, go to HubNashville or call 311 within Davidson County.

Frequently Asked Questions for Business Owners

When will Phase One: Reopening begin?

Monday, May 11, at 12:01 a.m.

Do I have to wear a mask?

Health Director’s Order 4, Face Coverings and Masks, as amended, requires all employees who interact with the public or who cannot maintain a safe social distance from their co-workers to wear a face covering or mask. All others are strongly encouraged to wear face coverings or masks when shopping or interacting with other members of the public, both for your safety and theirs.

Should or can business owners take the temperatures of employees before entry?

Employers are required to screen their employees daily for symptoms. The latest list of symptoms, including temperature, is available at: CDC guidelines for symptoms of COVID-19

Employees who have symptoms should be sent home.

Should or can business owners take the temperatures of customers before entry?

Each business should determine how best to screen their customers. We would advise that each business include on its website very explicit guidance for its customers. Business may require customers to wear a face covering or mask if they wish. Businesses should consult CDC guidelines for symptoms of COVID-19 and may post these and request that any potential customer with any of those symptoms please visit at a later date for the protection of your employees and your other customers.

Does Nashville have a hotline to report violations?

Yes. Rebort Violations on hubNashville

How long do we need to keep social distancing?

Because we lack general immunity to COVID-19 and because it is so contagious and debilitating, we will need to practice social distancing until our population is fully vaccinated or until antibody testing is sufficiently widespread and reliable. Public health experts advise that a vaccine may not be widely available until summer or fall of 2021, so we should prepare for a lengthy period of social distancing.

Do my customers need to wear a face covering?

Employees who interact with the public or who cannot maintain a safe social distance from their co-workers are required to wear face coverings or masks; customers are strongly encouraged to do so but are not required by Order 4 to do so. However, at its discretion a business may choose to require customers to wear a mask if it so wishes.

Are restaurants allowed to seat parties together?

Restaurants are allowed to operate at 50 percent capacity. Tables should be spaced so that the customers using them are at least six feet from other customers. No parties of more than six people are allowed.

What should I do if one of my employees tests positive for COVID-19?

If the employee does NOT have symptoms, they must be at least 10 days past the day they were tested before being allowed to return to work.

If the employee HAS symptoms, they must be at least 10 days past when their symptoms began; they must be feeling better; AND they cannot have had a fever in the previous 72 hours during which time they did not take any medication that reduces fever (Tylenol, Ibuprofen, acetaminophen, or ibuprofen) before being allowed to return to work.

Alternatively:

If an employee who previously tested positive wants to confirm their status to return to work by further testing, they must have two negative tests at least 24 hours apart before being allowed to return to work.

What should an employee do if they have been in contact with someone that tested positive for COVID-19?

For employees who have been in direct contact a positive case (they usually will have been contacted by public health officials in their county of residence with this information):

They must self-isolate for 14 days before returning to work. If they become symptomatic during this time, they should be tested. Refer employees who need to be tested to their personal medical provider or to a community assessment center. If they test positive, they should follow the information above.

What should an employee or business do if an employee has been tested but does not know the results?

The employee cannot return to work until the results are back. Before they can return to work, they must have BOTH: A negative test result AND not have been a contact of a positive case within the previous 14 days.

Where can I get personal protective equipment (PPE) for my employees?

Contact your vendors about ordering necessary soaps and sanitizers. Employees can follow CDC guidelines for making their own face coverings if you cannot acquire manufactured face coverings.

Where can I find training for my employees on safe serving practices?

Servsafe.com has free training and certification resources for restaurant and hospitality workers regarding safe food handling during the coronavirus outbreak.

When can my bar or restaurant allow live entertainment?

Live entertainment such as music, trivia, and game nights are allowed to resume during Phase Three.

Is it possible that we could have to revert back to a previous phase if there is a negative change in the COVID-19 metrics?

If the Metro Nashville COVID-19 Task Force determines that Nashville needs to revert back to a previous phase of the Roadmap to Reopen, that could impact your place of business.

Are businesses required to submit a written plan of action for reopening?

A written plan or policy is not mandated but would be useful for both you and your employees. It would require you to think through exactly how reopening will look for your establishment and inform employees of new expectations. Guidance for restaurants and for commercial/retail establishments is available at this website.

What Phase is my business in, and why?

The Phases are listed in the Roadmap For Reopening Nashville, available at this website.

Generally, individual business types are placed in different phases due to the nature of what they do and the danger of spreading the contagion that they pose. Close-interaction business such as hair, nail and massage parlors are included in Phase 2, for example, because of the close personal interaction intrinsic to that service. Large gatherings, where massive spread is possible, are delayed even further in time. This same logic is used to establish all phases and the business/enterprises within them.